Page is under constant update. New research contents will be added gradually. Please revisit! --- Sorry taking longer than expected ^_^

 

The following organizations and institutions are duly acknowledged for funding and supporting our research:


European Union (EU) Organizations:

Swedish Organizations:

Project: Modeling and Analysis of Random Spatial Systems for 5G Networks (EU-H2020-MARSS-5G)

Keywords: 5G Networks, V2x Communications, Autonomous Vehicles, Network Modeling, Road Safety
Fellowship: Marie Sklodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship
Program/Call: H2020-MSCA-IF-2014
Grant No.: SEP-210186649
Reference No.: 659933
Host:

Division of Communication and Antenna Systems (CAS),

Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden

Start Date: Sep. 07, 2015
E.U. Website: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/195863_en.html
Chalmers URL:

https://research.chalmers.se/en/project/?id=6579

http://www.chalmers.se/en/projects/Pages/Modeling-and-Analysis-of-Random-Spatial-Systems-for-5G-Networks.aspx 



Overview: 

Evidently, smart cities with autonomous vehicles will result in "sustainability" through: (i) a decrease in road-accidents; (ii) the amelioration of traffic fluidity; (ii) less dependence on traditional traffic lights and infrastructure; (iii) a minimization of wasted resources and mobility spending, and (iv) a decrease in pollution level. The ultimate objective of our research is to make an autonomous vehicle " smart" and "ultra-reliable" enabled via 5G networks. Since this is a very complex undertaking, we will focus and carefully investigate one critical use-case, the four-way intersection, where the objective is to make the network of vehicles around the intersection "intelligent" through RF connectivity. In particular, we want to explicitly understand the communication fidelity as vehicles navigate around the critical junction area.

 

Intersection Use-Case: The 4-way intersection use-case is a particular scenario of critical consequence to road-safety, productivity, wellbeing and sustainability of society. The figures below describe the impact and importance of intersections.

 

Fig.1a - Vehicular collision at intersections consist nearly 47% of all road accidents combined.

Fig.1b - Intersections are the leading cause for traffic congestion in cities. As a result, drivers are generally spending 40% in the car idling during gridlock.

V2x Communications: Technologies such as LiDARs, sensors, cameras, infrared vision are important for making a self-driving vehicle dependable and safe. However, in certain situations, such systems are simply insufficient to cope with the reality of road transportation. One such instance is the challenge of "blind-intersections" in a metropolitan environment. As shown by the figures below, V2x radio communication systems are practical for seeing around built-up corners. Alternatively, V2x systems can also serve as a redundant sensing technology by detecting and avoiding collisions with other nearby vehicles, cyclists, pedestrians, and random objects.

 

Fig.2a - LiDAR system mounted on vehicles is a key technology for autonomous capability.

Fig.2b - LiDAR systems have safety-critical limitations. Most notably they fail to see incoming vehicles "around corners"; the view is obstructed by buildings.

Fig.2c - Integration of V2x radio system can compensate for the limitations of autonomous vehicles and further improve its overall reliability.

5G Architecture: Internet-of-Things (IoT) will be powered by 5G communications. Two critical use-cases of 5G-IoT are "smart cities" and advancement in modern "automotive technology" with self-driving capability. Although IEEE 802.11p (a.k.a. DSRC) is an alternative to V2x communications managed by 5G cellular networks (a.k.a. C-V2x), it is nonetheless insufficient for a connected city. In short, we could think of DSRC as a subset of the anticipated 5G C-V2x communication. This essentially means that C-V2x will be more appropriate for the complexity IoT over connected cities, where everything that must be connected (i.e., vehicles, traffic lights, pedestrians, road side infrastructures) will be connected. The figures below show the use-cases of 5G communications, and the implications that will have in making an intersection intelligent via vehicular communication and cooperation.

 

Fig.3a - Smart cities, vehicular advancement, and automation are some of the exceptional use-cases of 5G wireless networks. These innovative technologies will ultimately disrupt traditional architectures.

Fig.3b - This is how an "intelligent intersection" will look once vehicles are autonomous and connected. Congestions, traffic jams, delays, and more importantly accidents are drastically minimized, with the ambitious objective of being completely eliminated.

 

Research: 

In what follows, we breifly outline the four work-packages (WPs) of this EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project. And in subsequent parts below, a subset of these WPs are demonstrated and described.

 

 

WP1 Characterization of V2V Channel Deterioration and Losses: The 

average reliability

Packet Detection Performance of V2V Communications about an Urban Intersection:

 

WP2 Deployment of Autonomous Vehicular Network: The 

equivalent network

VANET Communication Link over ....

 

WP3 Properties of Traffic Patterns for Resource Allocation: The 

network design

fine-grained reliability

 

WP4 Experimentation and Validation of Analytical Models: The

measurement campaigns

Empirical Validation of Random Networks:

interactive design tool

reproducible research ...

Experimental research/POC  and validation is needed to ascertain...

Movable Access-Point

 

RF Transceivers

Channel Evaluation

 


 

 

 

Channel: Suburban vs. Urban ..... [specialized Urban intersection channel!!]

Interference: Finite (practical) vs. Infinite (stress-test) ..... [finite interference region!!]

Traffic: RvD

 

Various V2V com. links are formed simultaneously. Here, we focus on the formation and the connectivity of one particular short-lived link around an intersection. As the vehicles maneuver, the reliability ought to remain on or above the minimum communications threshold for road-safety.

 

 

 

 

 

The fine-grained reliability analysis is actually compatible with different type of road configurations, namely, 4-way intersections, 3-way junctions, and single roads. 

 

 

   

 

 

RF Channels over a 4-way Intersection: Suburban vs. Urban.

 

... here we only scrutinizegg the RF reliability under the presence of interferers ....

Modeling: 

*Channel: Suburban ... Urban

*Traffic: network model ... and simulation

*No. Lanes: If we consider the lanes as uncorrelated, ... Lane size: 

......................................................................................................................DONE!!

It is important to highlight that ~ 50% of all accidents occur at the intersection, and so carefully studying the so-called "intersection problem" is crucial. The following 4 movies (2min each!) show the reliability per random traffic realization as a transmitting vehicle (TX) communicates with a receiving vehicle (RX) while it maneuvers around the intersection. We consider the granular reliability per traffic in a build-up metropolitan and in the suburbs. The results are quite remarkable. More on the "significance" of what the results really means for real-world deployment on vehicles with autonomous capability soon.....

 

Practical Values for Real-World Analysis Extreme Values for Fundamental Limits/Stress-Test Analysis
Case I: Urban Intersection, Small Road Segment (R = 200 m) Case II: Urban Intersection, Sizeable Road Segment (R = 10 km)

Case III: Suburban Intersection, Small Road Segment (R = 200 m) Case IV: Suburban Intersection, Sizeable Road Segment (R = 10 km)

 

More deatils about the above 4 movies are available here. Click the "TAB" for the case of interest to learn more about the outcome of V2V reliability.

Case I: Urban Intersection, Small Road Segment (R = 200 m)

The following short movie (~ 2 min only) shows the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications reliability for each standalone traffic realization around a corner in an urban intersection using Monte Carlo techniques based on plausible real-world traffic scenarios, channel propagation and system parameters. Press play and see the result!

We design the vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) in such a way that it inevitably meets a predefined target reliability. In other words, we want to determine the optimum transmit probability; i.e. the percentage of vehicles that can simultaneously transmit at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the wanted TX/RX pair. The design requirements and relationships are shown by the plots below for different a priori target reliability values evaluated for the worst-case TX/RX positions around an urban intersection. For 5G communications, the maximum TX/RX separation is 100 meters; and so we consider a TX and RX where both are located 50 meters away from a junction point on orthogonal roads.

 

Below, we show 1,000 random instances of the considered vehicular traffic. The intensity of each road is set to 0.01 vehicles per meter. Each speck that is shown below represent a vehicle (say a typical car of length ~ 5 meters) driving on one of the two roads forming the urban intersection. Each road is finite with road segment: R = 200 meters (in other words, the street length is 2R = 400 meters).

The previous "tab" showed the physical vehicular traffic considered. What is depicted below is the vehicular traffic composed of a TX and RX with deterministic positions around the urban intersection. Moreover, we show (with red specks) interfering vehicles that are actively transmitting at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the TX/RX pair. This graph is in fact the tolerated vehicular traffic while target reliability of 90% at the RX is still met. As you can see, in some instances, no interferers are tolerated by the RX. As such, we find it insightful to display the "void probability" of this tolerated traffic (i.e. the likelihood of not seeing a generated red speck or specks).

We analytically derived the average V2V reliability among communicating vehicles around an urban intersection with finite road segments. The plot below shows the outage probability for a network that is designed to meet a target reliability of 90% at the maximum TX/RX separation of 100 meters; which again is prescribed by the 5G requirements for V2V communications.

We show the meta distribution (MD) of reliability for each value of outage probability conditioned on a vehicular traffic. The accuracy of the displayed MD results improve as we consider a larger number of vehicular traffic realizations (i.e. as nppp increases). The plots utilizes 5,000 fading iterations to estimate each outage probability value associated with a particular vehicular traffic realization. These results are based on a designed vehicular network to meet a target reliability of 90% at the RX.

This meta distribution plot is similar to the previous "tab". The only exception is that the considered vehicular network is not designed to meet a certain predefined target reliability. Here, irrespective of the resulted reliability at the worst-case TX/RX separation at 100 meters, we consider a fixed Aloha transmit probability of 2%. 

 

 

Case II: Urban Intersection, Sizeable Road Segment (R = 200 km)

The following short movie (~ 2 min only) shows the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications reliability for each standalone traffic realization around a corner in an urban intersection using Monte Carlo techniques based on plausible real-world traffic scenarios, channel propagation and system parameters. Press play and see the result!

We design the vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) in such a way that it inevitably meets a predefined target reliability. In other words, we want to determine the optimum transmit probability; i.e. the percentage of vehicles that can simultaneously transmit at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the wanted TX/RX pair. The design requirements and relationships are shown by the plots below for different a priori target reliability values evaluated for the worst-case TX/RX positions around an urban intersection. For 5G communications, the maximum TX/RX separation is 100 meters; and so we consider a TX and RX where both are located 50 meters away from a junction point on orthogonal roads.

 

Below, we show 1,000 random instances of the considered vehicular traffic. The intensity of each road is set to 0.01 vehicles per meter. Each speck that is shown below represent a vehicle (say a typical car of length ~ 5 meters) driving on one of the two roads forming the urban intersection. Each road is finite with large road segment: R = 10 km (in other words, the street length is 2R = 20 km).

The previous "tab" showed the physical vehicular traffic considered. What is depicted below is the vehicular traffic composed of a TX and RX with deterministic positions around the urban intersection. Moreover, we show (with red specks) interfering vehicles that are actively transmitting at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the TX/RX pair. This graph is in fact the tolerated vehicular traffic while target reliability of 90% at the RX is still met. As you can see, in some instances, no interferers are tolerated by the RX. As such, we find it insightful to display the "void probability" of this tolerated traffic (i.e. the likelihood of not seeing a generated red speck or specks).

We analytically derived the average V2V reliability among communicating vehicles around an urban intersection with finite road segments. The plot below shows the outage probability for a network that is designed to meet a target reliability of 90% at the maximum TX/RX separation of 100 meters; which again is prescribed by the 5G requirements for V2V communications.

We show the meta distribution (MD) of reliability for each value of outage probability conditioned on a vehicular traffic. The accuracy of the displayed MD results improve as we consider a larger number of vehicular traffic realizations (i.e. as nppp increases). The plots utilizes 5,000 fading iterations to estimate each outage probability value associated with a particular vehicular traffic realization. These results are based on a designed vehicular network to meet a target reliability of 90% at the RX.

This meta distribution plot is similar to the previous "tab". The only exception is that the considered vehicular network is not designed to meet a certain predefined target reliability. Here, irrespective of the resulted reliability at the worst-case TX/RX separation at 100 meters, we consider a fixed Aloha transmit probability of 2%. 

 

 

Case III: Suburban Intersection, Small Road Segment (R = 200 m)

The following short movie (~ 2 min only) shows the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications reliability for each standalone traffic realization around a corner in an suburban intersection using Monte Carlo techniques based on plausible real-world traffic scenarios, channel propagation and system parameters. Press play and see the result!

We design the vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) in such a way that it inevitably meets a predefined target reliability. In other words, we want to determine the optimum transmit probability; i.e. the percentage of vehicles that can simultaneously transmit at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the wanted TX/RX pair. The design requirements and relationships are shown by the plots below for different a priori target reliability values evaluated for the worst-case TX/RX positions around an suburban intersection. For 5G communications, the maximum TX/RX separation is 100 meters; and so we consider a TX and RX where both are located 50 meters away from a junction point on orthogonal roads.

 

Below, we show 1,000 random instances of the considered vehicular traffic. The intensity of each road is set to 0.01 vehicles per meter. Each speck that is shown below represent a vehicle (say a typical car of length ~ 5 meters) driving on one of the two roads forming the suburban intersection. Each road is finite with road segment: R = 200 meters (in other words, the street length is 2R = 400 meters).

The previous "tab" showed the physical vehicular traffic considered. What is depicted below is the vehicular traffic composed of a TX and RX with deterministic positions around the suburban intersection. Moreover, we show (with red specks) interfering vehicles that are actively transmitting at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the TX/RX pair. This graph is in fact the tolerated vehicular traffic while target reliability of 90% at the RX is still met. As you can see, in some instances, no interferers are tolerated by the RX. As such, we find it insightful to display the "void probability" of this tolerated traffic (i.e. the likelihood of not seeing a generated red speck or specks).

We analytically derived the average V2V reliability among communicating vehicles around an suburban intersection with finite road segments. The plot below shows the outage probability for a network that is designed to meet a target reliability of 90% at the maximum TX/RX separation of 100 meters; which again is prescribed by the 5G requirements for V2V communications.

We show the meta distribution (MD) of reliability for each value of outage probability conditioned on a vehicular traffic. The accuracy of the displayed MD results improve as we consider a larger number of vehicular traffic realizations (i.e. as nppp increases). The plots utilizes 5,000 fading iterations to estimate each outage probability value associated with a particular vehicular traffic realization. These results are based on a designed vehicular network to meet a target reliability of 90% at the RX.

This meta distribution plot is similar to the previous "tab". The only exception is that the considered vehicular network is not designed to meet a certain predefined target reliability. Here, irrespective of the resulted reliability at the worst-case TX/RX separation at 100 meters, we consider a fixed Aloha transmit probability of 2%. 

 

 

Case IV: Suburban Intersection, Sizeable Road Segment (R = 10 km)

The following short movie (~ 2 min only) shows the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications reliability for each standalone traffic realization around a corner in an suburban intersection using Monte Carlo techniques based on plausible real-world traffic scenarios, channel propagation and system parameters. Press play and see the result!

We design the vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) in such a way that it inevitably meets a predefined target reliability. In other words, we want to determine the optimum transmit probability; i.e. the percentage of vehicles that can simultaneously transmit at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the wanted TX/RX pair. The design requirements and relationships are shown by the plots below for different a priori target reliability values evaluated for the worst-case TX/RX positions around an suburban intersection. For 5G communications, the maximum TX/RX separation is 100 meters; and so we consider a TX and RX where both are located 50 meters away from a junction point on orthogonal roads.

 

Below, we show 1,000 random instances of the considered vehicular traffic. The intensity of each road is set to 0.01 vehicles per meter. Each speck that is shown below represent a vehicle (say a typical car of length ~ 5 meters) driving on one of the two roads forming the suburban intersection. Each road is finite with large road segment: R = 10 km (in other words, the street length is 2R = 20 km).

The previous "tab" showed the physical vehicular traffic considered. What is depicted below is the vehicular traffic composed of a TX and RX with deterministic positions around the suburban intersection. Moreover, we show (with red specks) interfering vehicles that are actively transmitting at the same time-frame and frequency-band of the TX/RX pair. This graph is in fact the tolerated vehicular traffic while target reliability of 90% at the RX is still met. As you can see, in some instances, no interferers are tolerated by the RX. As such, we find it insightful to display the "void probability" of this tolerated traffic (i.e. the likelihood of not seeing a generated red speck or specks).

We analytically derived the average V2V reliability among communicating vehicles around an suburban intersection with finite road segments. The plot below shows the outage probability for a network that is designed to meet a target reliability of 90% at the maximum TX/RX separation of 100 meters; which again is prescribed by the 5G requirements for V2V communications.

We show the meta distribution (MD) of reliability for each value of outage probability conditioned on a vehicular traffic. The accuracy of the displayed MD results improve as we consider a larger number of vehicular traffic realizations (i.e. as nppp increases). The plots utilizes 5,000 fading iterations to estimate each outage probability value associated with a particular vehicular traffic realization. These results are based on a designed vehicular network to meet a target reliability of 90% at the RX.

This meta distribution plot is similar to the previous "tab". The only exception is that the considered vehicular network is not designed to meet a certain predefined target reliability. Here, irrespective of the resulted reliability at the worst-case TX/RX separation at 100 meters, we consider a fixed Aloha transmit probability of 2%. 

 

 

 

 

 

The United Nations International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has recently reported that the number of mobile users is expected to surpass the world population. In fact, it is expected that by 2020 mobile users will exceed an astonishing 9 Billion subscribers. With this unprecedented market penetration and growth, many communication engineering challenges are anticipated. In particular, next generation 5G wireless systems must be designed using sophisticated and innovative strategies and techniques. While 5G applications are expected to be diverse, the network architectures and devices need to ensure and deliver reliable, pervasive, and high-speed interconnection for various data-intensive applications (e.g., interactive multimedia streaming). These requirements must be accomplished while necessitating limited resources for a continuously expanding consumer demographics. Thus, deploying such complex networks is a formidable engineering feat that requires novel ways of modeling, evaluating, and designing extremely dense radio systems. This project aims, through the study of spatial geometry of randomly deployed mobile units, to develop several analytical tools to model, design, and analyze complex 5G networks, and validate them through experimental datasets. Ultimately, our broad goal is to conceptualize an engineering research idea, and then transitioning it into innovative applications that can be replicated for real-world cellular networks operated by established service providers and mobile manufacturers.

 

Track no.1 — Packet Detection Performance of V2V Communications about an Urban Intersection:

Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication about an intersection (either based on roundabouts or traffic signals) is a challenging problem that researchers are carefully investigating; among them, giant automotive manufacturers in Sweden, such as Volvo and Scania. Such research has various implications, particularly for accident avoidance systems, seamless connectivity, and future driverless vehicles. In addition to upper-layer analysis, extensive communications-based research is required at the link-layer level with strong emphasis on the network, the protocol, and the physical stack. In our research, the focus will be on the PHY and MAC layers, where we are especially interested to conceptualize, characterize and eventually derive predictive analytical models that offer some insight into this highly complex problem. The modeling and analysis that we intend to tackle will evaluate the quality of service (QoS) pertaining to the successful detection of packets between V2V communicating cars on orthogonal streets near an intersection.

The researchers interested into the V2V interconnection viability at the intersection have identified various intricacies that require careful investigation. As a consequence, we ought to derive performance evaluation models that can effectively be tuned for intersections in a built-up urban setting, or suburban and rural environments. Each of these situations will exhibit channel characteristics that are unique. The modeling that we will consider for the propagation channel of these environments will in fact be based on recent empirical measurements that have been conducted by the automotive industry. Meanwhile, in addition to the randomness introduced by the channel, the communications fidelity will also be impacted by random interfering vehicles. Overall the analysis for deriving the generic performance tools near an intersection will require a solid foundation in wireless communications, vehicular networks, stochastic geometry, RF propagation, probability theory, and Monte Carlo simulations. The benefit of the anticipated theoretical analysis that we aim to solve, will serve as a first-order tool that evaluates the transmission quality and transmission capacity as a function of vehicular positions, traffic intensities, and channel environments.

 

Track no.2 —VANET Communication Link over Highways and Interchanges:

A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is formed through the transmission of data packets among vehicular nodes by automatically hoping from source to destination. At core, and in its most basic form, this so-called spontaneous network requires that the data transfer among two communicating vehicular nodes be successfully accomplished through the effective minimization of the outage probability at the link-layer; and this must be fulfilled for each hop. In itself, the VANET principle is quite complex to establish; and if such network is desired to be formed over highways, then the related engineering endeavor will substantially be more intricate. Despite the overwhelming challenge, preliminary research in this topic could provide some basic understanding of the problem. In our research, we are interested to explore the quality of the inter-vehicular communication (IVC) while taking into account the irregularity of highways. Granted, expressways and freeways are generally straight roads; however, these roads may in fact be irregular, particularly at interchanges that connect different highways together. Overall, the aim for modeling and analyzing predictive connectivity tools for VANET over highway interchanges is expected to enlighten us on the interrelation among: the IVC communication range required to sustain a link; the status and profile of the road; the vehicular traffic; and the characteristics of the channel.

 

Organized Seminars:

 

-Interview with Chalmers University of Technology's INSIDAN, Sep. 17, 2015. [S2 newsletter]

-S. Valji, "Prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship for Mouhamed Abdulla: Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science Graduate off to Sweden this Fall," Advancement and Alumni Relations, Concordia University, Jun. 18, 2015.

 

Letter from Concordia University President and Vice-Chancellor,

Prof. Alan Shepard, Jul. 15, 2015.

Letter from Concordia University Dean,

Prof. Paula Wood-Adams, Jul. 16, 2015

 

 

 

Dissemination: 

The research of the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project was disseminated through different means, including: reports, publications, technical seminars, and outreach efforts.

 

Media Mentions:

 

check chalmers.se + insidan.x + YT


Deliverable of EU Reports:

 

eu-marss feb.2016 

eu-hights mar.24.2017

eu-marss nov.2017

 


Peer-Reviewed Contributions:

 

M. Abdulla, E. Steinmetz, and H. Wymeersch, "Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications with Urban Intersection Path Loss Models," In Proc. of IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM'16), pp. 1-6, Washington DC, USA, Dec. 4-8, 2016.

  

 

M. Abdulla and H. Wymeersch, "Fine-Grained vs. Average Reliability for V2V Communications around Intersections," In Proc. of IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM'17), pp. 1-5, Singapore, Dec. 4-8, 2017.

  

 

M. Abdulla and H. Wymeersch, "Fine-Grained Reliability for V2V Communications around Suburban and Urban Intersections," under review, IEEE Trans. on Wireless Communications, pp. 1-27, Jul. 2017.      

      

 

M. Abdulla and K. Wu, "5G Connected Vehicles: the Missing Link to Highly Autonomous Vehicles," Routes et transports Magazine, l'Association québécoise des transports (AQTr), vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 122-127, Oct. 2017. ISSN: 0319-3780 (print)

      

 

M. Abdulla and H. Wymeersch, "Vehicular Transmission Reliability over Blind Intersections," IEEE Swedish Communication Technologies Workshop (Swe-CTW'17), Göteborg, Sweden, Jun. 1-2, 2017. (poster session)

      

  

 

 


Presentation of Technical Seminars: One of the best ways to facilitate knowledge transfer of novel research results is to present and discuss it in formal settings, such as seminars and conferences. As such, we had the opportunity to give many talks on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) across the globe, namely, in: North America, Europe, Middle East, Asia and South East Asia. The interaction with different researchers while giving these seminars made us realize the strong interest and appetite of scholars and professional engineers on all aspects related to the innovative technology of connected and autonomous vehicles. We also benefited to learn the different research initiatives and strategic visions that is taking place in each of these countries and cities that we visited. Overall, we are delighted to highlight that a number of the visited research institutes have demonstrated strong interest in fostering collaboration on V2x communications for autonomous vehicles, where some preliminary work have begun. Below, we give a breakdown of the presented seminars.

 

North America Montréal/Québec/Canadaand Washington, D.C./USA

  • M. Abdulla, "Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications with Urban Intersection Path Loss Models," Wireless Networking and Control for Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (Wi-UAV), IEEE GLOBECOM'16, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, USA, Dec. 8, 2016.

  • M. Abdulla, "Les véhicules autonomes," l'École des métiers de l’informatique, du commerce et de l’administration de Montréal - EMICA, Montréal, Québec, Canada, Dec. 23, 2016. [The seminar was in French.] 

  • M. Abdulla, "Self-Driving Vehicles: The Path Forward with LIDAR and V2X Technologies," IEEE VTS/ComSoc/SPS Seminar, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, Jan. 5, 2017. [Abstract, and Slides are available on the bottom of the page:

  • M. Abdulla, "Pourquoi le Canada est-il en retard dans la course aux véhicules autonomes/connectés, et comment changer cette situation?," l'École des métiers de l’informatique, du commerce et de l’administration de Montréal - EMICA, Montréal, Québec, Canada, Dec. 21, 2017. [The seminar was in French.]

 

 


Europe/Scandinavia Sweden

 

 


G.C.C. Region/U.A.E. Dubai and Sharjah

  • M. Abdulla, "Highly Autonomous Vehicles with Connected Capability," Electrical Engineering Dept., College of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Dubai, Academic City, Dubai, U.A.E., Sep. 14, 2017. 

  • M. Abdulla, "Highly Autonomous Vehicles with Connected Capability," Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Sharjah, University City, Sharjah, U.A.E., Sep. 17, 2017. 

 

 


P.R.China/S.A.R. Beijing, Shenzhen and Hong Kong

  • M. Abdulla, "Theoretical vs. Experimental Research: How to be a Relevant Telecom Engineer?," Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R.China, Jul. 19, 2017.

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained Reliability for V2X Communications," School of Electronic Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), Beijing, P.R.China, Jul. 20, 2017.

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained Reliability for V2X Communications," Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R.China, Jul. 21, 2017.

  • M. Abdulla, "On Spatial Correlation of Shadowing for Movable Small-Cell Networks," Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R.China, Jul. 25, 2017.

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained Reliability for V2X Communications," Future Network Theory Lab, 2012 Labs, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., Hong Kong Science Park, N.T., Hong Kong, Jul. 28, 2017. [The seminar was also broadcasted live to the Shenzhen Research Lab.] 

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained Reliability for V2X Communications," Communication Eng. Research Center, Key Lab. Oriented Intelligent Computation, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong, P.R.China, Aug. 2, 2017.

 

 


Southeast Asia/ASEAN Singapore

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained vs. Average Reliability for V2V Communications around Intersections," Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communications in Wireless Networks (URLLC), IEEE GLOBECOM'17, Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre, Singapore, Dec. 4, 2017.

  • M. Abdulla, "Fine-Grained Assessment of URLLC for V2X Communications," Smart Mobility Experience Lab (SMEx Lab), Centre for Infocomm Technology (INFINITUS), School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, Dec. 8, 2017.

 

 


Outreach Efforts: We also disseminated our research and its social implications with the general public. In fact, we were invited by the organizing committee of Europe's leading popular science event (with 70,000 visitors), "The International Science Festival in Gothenburg" to co-organize and participate in various science and technology based activities and exercises, panel discussions, and outreach talks. As such, we brought R&D engineers from academia and industry working on next-generation 5G telecommunication systems, which will facilitate innovative technologies such as self-driving vehicles. The details of these events are chronicled below.

 

Hands-on Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Special thanks to the following participants:

  • Ms. Malin Ulfvarson (Chalmers ICT)

  • Dr. Katrin Sjöberg (Volvo Group)

  • Mr. Sven Jacobsson (Ericsson Research)

  • Dr. Ayca Ozcelikkale (Chalmers S2)

  • Dr. Amina Piemontese (Chalmers S2).

Panel Discussions

Outreach Talks

     

 

Activities: 

Over the period of the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project we took part in various research and academic related activities. Some of these events are listed in the subsections below.

 

 

Research Grants: Our research is supported, in part, by the following agencies and organizations.

 

EU-H2020-MARSS-5G Project, "Modeling and Analysis of Random Spatial Systems for 5G Networks," Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (MSCA-IF-2014-EF), Grant No. 659933, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium, 2015 — Amount: € 173,857.20.

 

EU-H2020-HIGHTS Project, "High Precision Positioning for Cooperative ITS Applications," Research and Innovation Action: Cooperative ITS for Safe, Congestion-Free and Sustainable Mobility (MG-3.5a-2014), Grant No. 636537, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium, 2015 — Amount: € 5,999,616.25.

 

EU-H2020-is3DMIMO Project, "Indoor Small-Cell Networks with 3D MIMO Array Antennas," Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (MSCA-RISE-2016), Grant No. 734798, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium, 2017 — Amount: € 1,309,500.00.

 

"5G-V2X Communications for Intelligent Transportation Systems," Chalmers Research Grant, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, 2016-2017 — Amount: 97,000.00 SEK.

 

"Ultra-Reliability for 5G Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications," Ericsson Research Foundation, Grant No. FOSTIFT-16:043-17:054, Stockholm, Sweden, 2016-2017 — Amount: 58,000.00 SEK.


Visit to Research Institutes: As part of the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project and other EU funding, we had the opportunity to visit various research institutes. These visits included universities and corporations, located in different parts of the world, for seminars, meetings and research discussions. Overall, these visits have strengthen researcher-to-researcher connection, cooperation and interaction of ideas for pushing the boundaries of technical innovation.

 

Visiting Research Fellow, Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R. China: July/Aug 2017.

  • This visit was supported by the EU-H2020-is3DMIMO project with focus on: spatial correlation of shadowing.

  • We had various meetings and discussions regarding 5G communications and ITS/VANET networks.
  • We also interacted with senior faculty members, postdocs, and graduate students, regarding technical topics, mathematical tools, and simulation practices.

  • We held meetings and exchanged research ideas with other visiting scholars from western universities, including Stanford University.

  • We were invited to give multiple talks to the communications research group, the EE department and visiting scholars regarding our most recent research work.

  • In addition to strengthening research ties between scholars in the East and the West, this extended research visit made us further appreciate the great traditions and history of the Chinese culture through visits to historical sites in the capitol Beijing.

  • Hosts: Prof. Yuan Shen (Research Institute of High-Speed Signal Processing and Network Transmission, Tsinghua Univ.), and Prof. Sheng Zhou (Research Institute of Telecommunications, Tsinghua Univ.).

 

Other Research Visits: Shorter visits (i.e. that lasted a week or less) to research institutes are listed below.
  • School of Information Tech., Halmstad Univ., Nov.11.2015 & Nov.2.2016 (Host: Prof. Elisabeth Uhlemann).

  • Dept. of Electrical & Computer Eng., Concordia Univ., Dec.16.2015 (Host: Dr. Anader Benyamin-Seeyar).

  • Electrical & Computer Eng. Dept., McGill Univ., Jan.5.2017 (Host: Prof. Fabrice Labeau).

  • School of Electrical Eng., KTH Royal Institute of Tech., May.18.2017 (Host: Prof. Lars Kildehřj Rasmussen).

  • 5G Standardization Group, China Mobile, Jul.15.2017 (Host: Ms. Yi Zhang, Beijing).

  • School of Electronic Eng., Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecom., BUPT, Jul.20.2017 (Host: Prof. Li Wang).

  • Future Network Theory Lab, 2012 Labs, Huawei Hong Kong, Jul.27-28.2017 (Host: Dr. Bo Bai).

  • School of Electr. & Infor. Eng., Harbin Institute of Tech., Jul.30-Aug.2.2017 (Host: Prof. Yang Wang, HITSZ).

  • Dept. of Eng. & Information Tech., Univ. of Dubai, Sep.14.2017 (Host: Prof. Hussain Al-Ahmad).

  • Dept. of Electrical & Computer Eng., Univ. of Sharjah, Sep.17.2017 (Host: Prof. Sohaib Majzoub).

  • Dept. of Electrical Eng., ÉTS, Univ. of Québec, Oct.11.2017 (Host: Prof. René Jr. Landry).

  • School of Electrical & Electronic Eng., Nanyang Tech. Univ., Dec.5.2017 (Host: Prof. Yong Liang Guan).


Distinguished Professors Invited to Chalmers: We hosted the following Professors to travel to Gothenburg/Sweden and to spend a week at the Dept. of Electrical Engineering of Chalmers University of Technology. As part of these visits, these distinguished scholars presented tutorial-style seminars on their area of expertise and their latest research work on 5G communications. We also had elongated discussions regarding our research on vehicular communications, and as a consequence of these exchanges, joint collaboration is underway.

 

Prof. Martin Haenggi, IEEE Fellow (University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN, USA) — May. 2-6, 2016. Expertise: Stochastic Geometry.

 

Prof. Ke Wu, IEEE Fellow, IEEE MTT-S President (Polytechnique-MTL, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada) — Apr. 24-28, 2017. Expertise: Antenna Design.

 

Prof. Ekram Hossain, IEEE Fellow, IEEE VTS DL (University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada) — May. 15-19, 2017. Expertise: Resource Allocation.

 

Prof. Walid Saad (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA) — Jun. 19-23, 2017. Expertise: Game Theory.

 

 

 

Organization of Technical Seminars:

 

EU-MARSS-5G & IEEE Sweden (R8-Europe) Sponsored Seminars
  • Workshop: 

    • M.H. keynote

    •  

    •  

    •  

  • Ekram Hossain (Univ. Manitoba, Canada), “On Coalition-Based Cooperative Packet Delivery in Vehicular Delay-Tolerant Networks Under Uncertainty,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, Sep. 12, 2016. Abstract  IEEE Sweden

  • Ekram Hossain (Univ. Manitoba, Canada), “Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access (NOMA) for 5G Wireless,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, May. 17, 2017. Abstract

  • Ekram Hossain (Univ. Manitoba, Canada), “Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access (NOMA) for 5G Wireless,” KTH Royal Institute of Tech., Stockholm, Sweden, May. 18, 2017.

  • Ekram Hossain (Univ. Manitoba, Canada), “Multi-tier Drone Cell Network: A New Frontier for 5G Research,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, May. 19, 2017. Abstract

  • ,,

  • Ke Wu (Univ. of Montréal, Canada), “Multi-Dimension, Multi-Function and Multi-Band Substrate Integrated Waveguide Antennas and Arrays for GHz and THz Applications,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, Apr. 25, 2017. Abstract

  • Ke Wu (Univ. of Montréal, Canada), “Enabling Ambient Electromagnetic Energy Harvesting for Future Internet of Things and Smart Environment,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, Apr. 27, 2017. Abstract

  • ,,

  •  

EU-MARSS-5G Sponsored Seminars
  • Walid Saad (Virginia Tech., USA), “The Internet of Everything: Context-Awareness, Drones, and V2X Networks,” Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Göteborg, Sweden, Jun. 21, 2017. Abstract

  • ets-tommy..

  • a.t.......

IEEE Montréal (R7-Canada) Sponsored Seminars
  • fawzi, m.h., tommy..

  • M.......

 

 

VTS

COMSOC

SPS

MTT-S


Committee Assignments:

 

standards ... green WG.... india conf. .... EW18
IEEE Standards Association Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Working Group....


Supervision of Graduate Students:

 

Various students took part in the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project, including: 2 Industrial PhD + 3 MSc + 2 BSc. They each contributed to a particular aspect of the project. For more, please to the Team section on this page.

Former students are now affiliated with: Volvo Cars, RISE, Telia, . The junior students are now pursuing higher-education in graduate schools in Sweden and abroad.

Students were recruited using ads posted on social media and on advertisement board around Chalmers. An example is shown here: 

 

Teaching Activities: Although most of the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project duration was devoted to research-related endeavors, we nonetheless contributed to teaching activities. This included lecturing of technical materials, attending teaching workshops, and exchanging with colleagues experiences on: teaching, learning, and course development.

 

Guest Lecturer, "SSY-135: Wireless Communications" graduate-level course, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, winter semester, 2017. Outline 

 

Moderator (WS3 session), "Entrepreneurial Experiences in Engineering Programs: What Is It And Why Should We Do It?," Chalmers Annual Conference on Teaching and Learning (KUL'17), Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, Jan. 12, 2017. [The session is available on Page-8

 

Participation in Conferences & Workshops: We participated in various technical conferences that took place abroad and in Sweden. These events provided us with insights on advances in modern technological innovation and fundamental research. We also found these venues beneficial for connecting and exchanging ideas with likeminded researchers.

 

International Conferences
  • The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize Week Dialogue Conference on "The Future of Intelligence: AI", Svenska Mässan, Göteborg, Sweden, Dec. 9, 2015. 

  • IEEE ITSoc European School of Information Theory (ESIT'16), Göteborg, Sweden, Apr. 4-8, 2016.    [P.19]

  • IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM'16), Washington DC, USA, Dec. 4-8, 2016.

  • IEEE SPS/EURASIP Summer School on Signal Processing for 5G Wireless Access (S3P'17), Göteborg, Sweden, May. 29-Jun. 1, 2017.

  • IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM'17), Singapore, Dec. 4-8, 2017.

 

Swedish Conferences
  • IEEE VTS Society Workshop on Wireless Vehicular Communications (WWVC'15), Halmstad, Sweden, Nov. 11, 2015. 

  • IEEE/Chalmers Workshop on 5G Wireless and Vehicular Communications (CWVC'16), Göteborg, Sweden, May. 3, 2016.

  • IEEE VTS Society Workshop on Wireless Vehicular Communications (WWVC'16), Halmstad, Sweden, Nov. 2, 2016. 

  • IEEE Swedish Communication Technologies Workshop (Swe-CTW'17), Göteborg, Sweden, Jun. 1-2, 2017. 

 

Chalmers Conferences
  • Chalmers Communication Systems Group Workshop 2015 (CSWorkshop'15), Säröhus, Särö, Sweden, Oct. 26-27, 2015. 

  • Research Seminars, Chalmers Signals and Systems Day (S2-day'16), Göteborg, Sweden, May. 12, 2016. 

  • Chalmers Communication Systems Group Workshop 2016 (CSWorkshop'16), Hjortviken Konferens, Hindĺs, Sweden, Oct. 26-27, 2016.

  • Visit to the Visual Arena, Lindholmen Science Park, Göteborg, Sweden, Nov. 24, 2016. 

  • 7th Chalmers Annual Conference on Teaching and Learning (KUL'17), Göteborg, Sweden, Jan. 12, 2017.

  • Chalmers Initiative Seminar on "Digitalisation: Opportunities and Challenges", Göteborg, Sweden, Mar. 15-16, 2017.

  • Research Seminars, Chalmers Electrical Engineering Day (E2-day'17), Göteborg, Sweden, May. 22, 2017. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Continuing Education on 5G Deployment: We attended various lectures and tutorials by industry researchers affiliated with major automotive and telecommunication companies working on real-world deployment. We also had the pleasure and opportunity to interact and discuss our research work on connected vehicles with some of these speakers.

 

Automotive
  • Dr. Katrin Sjöberg (Volvo Trucks/Sweden), "Platooning: Cooperative ITS & Active Safety," WWVC'15, Halmstad, Sweden, Nov. 11, 2015.

  • Dr. Erik Coelingh (Volvo Cars/Sweden), "Volvo Autopilot: the Technology that Makes the Car Drive Itself," S2-day'16, Göteborg, Sweden, May. 12, 2016.

  • Dr. Katrin Sjöberg (Volvo Trucks/Sweden), "C-ITS Deployment in Europe: Current Status and Outlook," WWVC'16, Halmstad, Sweden, Nov. 2, 2016.

  • Dr. John Kenney (Toyota InfoTechnology Center/SF,USA), "Dedicated Short Range Vehicular Communications - DSRC: Overview, Technical Challenges, and Applications," Washington D.C., USA, Dec. 8, 2016. Abstract

 

Network Infrastructure
  • Dr. Joachim Sachs (Ericsson Research/Sweden), "Vehicular Communications via Cellular Networks," WWVC'15, Halmstad, Sweden, Nov. 11, 2015.

  • Dr. Stefan Parkvall (Ericsson Research/Sweden), "4G, LTE, and the Road to 5G," Göteborg, Sweden, Apr. 18 & 21, 2016. 

  • Dr. Patrick Marsch (Nokia/Poland), "Nokia’s View on 5G Mobile Communications, and Specific 5G Challenges Addressed in Nokia Bell Labs Wroclaw," Göteborg, Sweden, Sep. 15, 2016. Abstract

  • Dr. Peiying Zhu (Huawei/Ottawa,Canada), "5G Field Trial Update," Washington D.C., USA, Dec. 6, 2016. Abstract

  • Dr. Sara Mazur (Ericsson Research/Sweden), "5G: A Game Changer," Göteborg, Sweden, Mar. 15, 2017. Abstract

 

Mobile Chip
  • Dr. Edward Tiedemann (Qualcomm/SD,USA), "Big Steps in Wireless: Applications, Spectrum, and Technology," Washington D.C., USA, Dec. 5, 2016. Abstract

  • Dr. Michael Stetter (Intel/Munich), "5G Needs a Transformation of Wireless Landscape," Washington D.C., USA, Dec. 5, 2016. Abstract

  • Dr. Wonil Roh (Samsung/S.Korea), "5G: From Vision to Reality," Washington D.C., USA, Dec. 6, 2016. Abstract

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team: 

The following team members have contributed and collaborated to the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project. The team is composed of senior scholars, industrial PhD candidates, and MSc students, with expertise in fundamental research, computational algorithms, design applications, empirical measurements, and data analysis. The particular specialization of each member is listed below:

 

Mouhamed Abdulla

Marie-Curie Fellow (PI)

Chalmers U. Tech.

Henk Wymeersch

Professor (Co-PI)

Chalmers U. Tech.

Andres A. Glazunov

Professor

Chalmers U. Tech.

Erik M. Steinmetz

Ph.D. Candidate

RISE

Srikar Muppirisetty

Ph.D. Candidate

Chalmers U. Tech.

Performance Evaluation

   

Network Analysis

Channel Propagation

V2V Communications

Predictive Modeling

Bjarki Vilmarsson

M.Sc., MPSYS

Chalmers U. Tech.

Daoyuan Yang

M.Sc., MPCOM

Chalmers U. Tech.

Suhail Ahmad

M.Sc., MPCOM

Chalmers U. Tech.

Rikard Reinhagen

B.Sc. Student

Chalmers U. Tech.

Martin Dahlgren

B.Sc. Student

Chalmers U. Tech.

System Design Tool

Design Application

Measurement Campaigns

Empirical Analysis

Hardware Configuration

 

 

Social Media: 

We regularly share updates of the EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project on social-media. For more, you may follow and interact with us on the following platforms:

 

  For media inquiries or to setup an interview on connected/autonomous vehicles, please send an email to: ma14@ieee.org

 


Photos from a number of social events is available below. Research discussions was indeed at the forefront of these outdoor excursions!

 

On visit to Brännö with Prof. Martin Haenggi, Göteborg Archipelago, Sweden, May 5, 2016.

On visit to Vinga with Chalmers ComSys Group, Göteborg Archipelago, Sweden, Jun. 8, 2016.

On visit to Washington D.C., for IEEE GLOBECOM'16, USA, Dec. 4-8, 2016.

On visit to Stockholm with Prof. Ekram Hossain following a seminar at KTH, Sweden, May. 18, 2017.

On visit to The Great Wall of China with Prof. Li Wang and Dr. Bin Dong, Mutianyu section, Beijing, P.R.China, Jul. 23, 2017.

On visit to Shenzhen Bay Park with Prof. Jian Yang, Shenzhen, P.R.China, Aug. 2, 2017.

 


Last Update: January 16, 2018 03:13 AM | Copyright © 2015-2017. All Rights Reserved. The EU-H2020-MARSS-5G project page is maintained by Mouhamed Abdulla